[Person photo]

Department web site

Research web site

Benjamin Rottman

Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh Department of Psychology

Research Scientist, Learning Research & Development Center

Research Interests

  • Causal learning, reasoning, and judgment
  • Medical diagnosis and decision-making

Rottman, B. M. (2017). The acquisition and use of causal structure knowledge. In M.R. Waldmann (Ed.), Oxford Handbook of Causal Reasoning (pp. 85-114). Oxford: Oxford U.P.

Rottman, B. M., Marcum, Z. A., Thorpe, C. T., & Gellad, W. F. (2017). Medication adherence as a learning process: Insights from cognitive psychology. Health Psychology Review, 11(1), 17-32.

Rottman, B. M. (2017). Physician Bayesian updating from personal beliefs about the base rate and likelihood ratio. Memory & Cognition, 45, 270-280.

Rottman, B. (2016). Physician Bayesian updating from personal beliefs about the base rate and likelihood ratio. Memory and Cognition, 1-11.

Rottman, B.M., Prochaska, M.T. & Deaño, R.C. (2016). Bayesian reasoning in residents’ preliminary diagnoses. Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, 1(5).

Derringer, C. & Rottman, B. M. (2016). Temporal causal strength learning with multiple causes. In A. Papafragou, D. Grodner, D. Mirman, & J. Trueswell (Eds.), Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Soo, K. & Rottman, B. M. (2016). Causal learning with continuous variables over time. In A. Papafragou, D. Grodner, D. Mirman, & J. Trueswell (Eds.), Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Rottman, B. M. (2016). Searching for the best cause: Roles of mechanism beliefs, autocorrelation, and exploitation. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition,42(8), 1233-1256.

Rottman, B. M., Hastie, R. (2016). Do people reason rationally about causally related events? Markov violations, weak inferences, and failures of explaining away. Cognitive Psychology, 87, 88-134.

Soo, K. & Rottman, B.M. (2014) Learning Causal Direction from Transitions with Continuous and Noisy Variables. In P. Bello, M. Guarini, M. McShane, & B. Scassellati (Eds.), Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Rottman, B.M. (2014) Information Search in an Autocorrelated Causal Learning Environment. In P. Bello, M. Guarini, M. McShane, & B. Scassellati (Eds.), Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Rottman, B. M., & Hastie, R. (2014). Reasoning about causal relationships: inferences on causal networks. Psychological Bulletin, 140(1), 109-139. 

Rottman, B. M., Kominsky, J. F., & Keil, F. C. (2014). Children use temporal cues to learn causal directionality. Cognitive Science, 38, 489-513.

Edwards, B. J., Rottman, B. M., Shankar, M., Betzler, R., Chituc, V., Rodriguez, R., Santos, L. R. (2014) Do Capuchin Monkeys (Cebus paella) Diagnose Causal Relations in the Absence of a Direct Reward? (E. Flynn, Ed.) PLoS ONE, 9(2).

Rottman, B.M., & Keil, F.C. (2012). Causal Structure Learning over Time: Observations and Interventions. Cognitive Psychology. 64, 93-125. doi:10.1016/j.cogpsych.2011.10.003

Rottman, B. M., Genter, D., & Goldwater, M. B. (2012). Causal systems categories: Differences in novice and expert categorization of causal phenomena. Cognitive Science, 36, 919-932.

Rottman, B.M., & Ahn, W. (2011). Effect of grouping of evidence types on learning about interactions between observed and unobserved causes. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition, 37, 1432-1448. doi:10.1037/a0024829

Rottman, B. M., Kim, N. S. Ahn, W., & Sanislow, C. A.  (2011). Can personality disorder experts recognize DSM-IV personality disorders from Five-Factor Model descriptions of patient cases? The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 72, 630-635.

Rottman, B. M., & Keil, F. C. (2011). What matters in scientific explanations: Effects of elaboration and content. Cognition, 121, 324–337.

Rottman, B. M., Ahn, W., Sanislow, C. A., & Kim, N. S. (2009). Can clinicians recognize DSM-IV personality disorders from Five-Factor model descriptions of patient cases? The American Journal of Psychiatry, 166, 427-433. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.2008.08070972

Principal Investigator Benjamin Rottman, Associate Professor, Psychology, and LRDC Research Scientist received a National Science Foundation grant for “CAREER: Causal Reasoning in Daily Life and its Role in Science Literacy” on July 1, 2017.

July 2017

LRDC Research Scientist, Benjamin Rottman, Psychology, has been named a 2016 APS Rising Star. The APS Rising Star designation is presented to outstanding psychological scientists in the earliest stages of their research careers post-PhD.

February 15, 2017

View

LRDC Research Scientist Benjamin Rottman's research article in clinical diagnosis is mentioned in the Psychonomic Society blog post "#goCRPI: Bayes battling baserate neglect in medical diagnosis."

October 6, 2016

View

Tim Nokes-Malach, with colleagues, has been awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation for "Build, Understand, & Tune Interventions that Cumulate to Real Impact." This interdisciplinary project includes LRDC researchers Christian Schunn, Benjamin Rottman, Kevin Binning, and Center Associates Chandralekha Singh and Elizabeth Votruba-Drzal and other Pitt faculty across the disciplines of biology, chemistry, and physics.

August 21, 2015

View

Ben Rottman received a National Science Foundation grant titled "Developing a Theory of Causal Learning over Time."

August 2014

Ben Rottman received a grant for "Active-Learning of Psychological Research Methods: Authentic Skill Development through Rich Real-World Research Examples and Representations" from the University of Pittsburgh’s recently established dB-SERC (Discipline-Based Science Education Research Center). LRDC Center Associate Chandralekha Singh is the director of the new center.

May 2014